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July 22, 2015

Condition of U.S. Corn Improves Slightly, Soybeans Hold Steady

Corn - The condition of the 2015 U.S. corn crop held steady last week at 69% rated good to excellent. Ten states indicated that the corn condition had improved last week and 6 states indicated that the corn condition had declined last week. Most of the improvements were found in the western and northern Corn Belt while most of the declines were found in the eastern Corn Belt. The top five rated corn states are: Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Iowa. The five states with the lowest rated corn are: Indiana, Ohio, North Carolina, Missouri, and Illinois.

While the percent of good to excellent held steady, there was a 2% shift from the good to the excellent category. This gave a slight boost to the overall corn condition and corn crop this week is in a little better condition than the long term average.

Soybeans - The condition of the 2015 U.S. soybean crop held steady last week at 62% rated good to excellent. Nine states indicated that the soybean crop had improved last week and 8 states indicated that the soybean condition had declined last week. Most of the improvements were found in the western and northern Corn Belt while most of the declines were found in the eastern Corn Belt. The top five rated soybean states are: Wisconsin, Mississippi, Tennessee, Minnesota, and North Dakota. The five states with the lowest rated soybeans are: Missouri, Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, and Kansas.

The condition of the soybean crop held essentially equal to the long term average. The soybean crop continues to underperform compared to the corn crop.

Soil moisture - The nation's topsoil got dryer last week with 7 states indicating that the soils got wetter last week and 11 states indicating that the soils got dryer. Most of the soils that got wetter were found in the northern and eastern Corn Belt while most of the soils that got dryer were found in the southern and western Corn Belt. The five states with the wettest soils are: Ohio, Indiana, Missouri, Illinois, and Kentucky. The five states with the driest soils are: Mississippi, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Dakota, and Arkansas.

The nation's topsoil got dryer for the third week in a row, but unfortunately it is still saturated in many areas of the eastern Corn Belt. One of the biggest changes this week was in the Delta where the soils got significantly dryer. Even with the drying, the topsoil nationwide is still much wetter than last year and certainly much wetter than the long term average.