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July 8, 2015

Corn Condition Improves Slightly, Soybean Condition Holds Steady

Corn - The condition of the 2015 U.S. corn crop increased 1% last week to 68% rated good to excellent. Ten states indicated that the condition of the corn improved last week and 7 states indicated that the condition of the corn had declined last week. Most of the improvements were found in the western and southern areas, while most of the declines were found in the eastern Corn Belt. The top five rated corn states are: Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Tennessee, Minnesota, and Iowa. The five states with the lowest rated corn are: Indiana, Ohio, Missouri, North Carolina, and Kansas.

The nationwide condition of the corn crop is now rated essentially equal to the long term average. The warmer and dryer weather last week helped the corn to put on some needed growth.

Soybeans - The condition of the 2015 U.S. soybean crop held steady last week at 63% rated good to excellent. Eight states indicated that the soybean condition had improved last week and 7 states indicated that the soybean condition had declined last week. Most of the improvements were found in the western and southern Corn Belt, while most of the declines were found in the eastern Corn Belt. The top five rated soybean states are: Wisconsin, Mississippi, Iowa, Kentucky, and Minnesota. The five lowest rated soybean states are: Missouri, Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, and Kansas.

The nationwide condition of the soybean crop is also now essentially equal to the long term average. Continued dryer weather in the eastern Corn Belt (at least in the near term) would be highly desirable for the soybean crop.

Soil moisture - Finally, the nation's topsoil got a little dryer last week with 7 states indicating that their soils got wetter last week and 11 states indicating that their soils got dryer last week. Most of the wetter soils were found in the southern locations while most of the dryer soils were found all across the Corn Belt. The five states with the wettest soils are: Ohio, Indiana, Missouri, Illinois, and Kentucky. The five states with the driest soils are: North Carolina, Kansas, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Wisconsin.

This past week was relatively dry compared to previous weeks, so some areas did have the opportunity to dry out somewhat. The soil moisture graph at the end of this report looks a little different than last week's graph because after the June Acreage Report was released, I recalculated the weight of each state to reflect the harvested acreage instead of the planting intensions from the March Report. Either way you calculate it, the nation's topsoil is much wetter than the long term average.