Back
June 18, 2019

2019 U.S. Corn Condition Unchanged at 59% Good to Excellent

Author: Michael Cordonnier/Soybean & Corn Advisor, Inc.

Corn - The nationwide corn condition rating was unchanged this week at 59% rated good to excellent. Ten states indicated that the corn condition improved last week while 7 states indicated that the corn condition declined last week with 1 state unchanged. Most of the improvements were found in the western Corn Belt while most of the declines were found in the eastern Corn Belt. The top five rated corn states are: Kentucky, Tennessee, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, and Colorado. The five lowest rated corn states are: Missouri, Michigan, Kansas, Illinois, and North Carolina.

Generally, the corn conditions improve slightly this time of the year as the corn starts to take up nitrogen and turn a darker green color. Remember, these condition ratings are based on visual observations, basically a "windshield survey." I anticipate that the condition will improve slightly next week.

Soybeans - The USDA has not yet issued a nationwide soybean condition rating due to the delayed planting and emergence. The first condition will be issued next week, which is at least two weeks later than normal. Usually by June 12th we have the first soybean condition and when the first soybean conditions are reported, I expect for them to be similar to the corn conditions.

Soil Moisture - The nation's soils became slightly dryer again last week, but it was a mixed bag. Twelve states indicated that their soils got dryer last week while 5 states indicated that their soils got wetter last week with 1 state unchanged. Most of the dryer soils were found in the western Corn Belt and the Delta while most of the wetter soils were found in the eastern Corn Belt. The five states with the wettest soils are: Kansas, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, and Illinois. The five states with the driest soils are: Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas, Louisiana, and North Dakota.

The nation's soils are still much wetter than normal and for the next few weeks, we need to look at the soil moisture situation as the reverse of normal. In the short term, if the soils become dryer, that is a good thing. If the soils become wetter, that is a bad thing. As we get further into the summer, the soil moisture situation may become more normal.